Chaski photo

El sariri (1995)

Independently produced by Chaski in 1995; released 28 Oct 1995
This recording is in stock, and also available on iTunes, napster.com, MSN music, Yahoo! music and other services. Purchase online or on iTunes.

Track 1: The driving rhythm and arching melodic shape of characterize this example of Bolivian festival music composed by Salomón Callejas. El sariri (The Wanderer) poetically describes many aspects of typical Andean life: multi-colored landscapes, dark-skinned people, ponchos to protect against the winds, the flavor of memories, the Indian struggle, and the rugged mountains. (bombo, palmas, ronroco, zampoñas) 4:38

Tengo que llegar al pueblo (I must get to the town)
Ahí me espera mi madre (My mother awaits me)
Tierra de gente morena (Land of dark-skinned people)
Paisaje color aguayo (Multi-colored landscape)
Tierra de gente morena (Land of dark-skinned people)
Paisaje color aguayo. (Multi-colored landscape)
Soy el sariri del Andes (I am the wanderer of the Andes)
Caminando muchas lunas (Traveling many moons)
Con mi wayrapi al viento (With my poncho to the wind)
Con el sabor del recuerdo (With the flavor of memories)
Con el lamento del indio (With the Indian struggle)
Subiendo por las quebradas. (Climbing the rugged mountains.)

Track 2: The Peruvian pasacalle, La pampa y la puna (The Prairie and the Plateau) by Carlos Valderrama, demonstrates the enormous expressive capabilities of the quena, an ancient, haunting flute of the Andes. (accordion, güiro, guitar, quena) 4:06

Track 3: The Argentine bailecito, Viva Jujuy (Long Live Jujuy) by Rafael Rossa (mistakenly credited to Edmundo Zaldívar in liner notes), extols the virtues of northern Argentina near the city of Jujuy. The lyrics speak of the plateau, the red-painted hills, the jagged mountains, and a man's sweetheart from Humahuaca. (bombo, charango, guitar, harp, quena) 3:40

Viva jujuy, viva la Puna, viva mi amada
Vivan los cerros pintarojeados de mi quebrada
De mi quebrada, Humahuaqueña
No te separes de mis amores
Tú eres mi dueña.

Track 4: Los doctorcitos (The Little Doctors) is an auki auki or grandfather's dance from Bolivia. We play four sizes of zampoñas including the gigantic toyas. (bombo, triangle, zampoñas) 5:46

Track 5: The Bolivian huayño, Kullakita (Little Sister) was composed by Miguel Conde V. (b. 1956) and has lyrics in Aymará and Quechua, the two primary indigenous languages of Bolivia. bass drum, (bombo, chajchas, charango, guitar, zampoñas) 4:02

spoken:
Jilatanaka kullakitanaka (Hermanos, hermanita)
Ma pita sartasiñani (Rápido nos levantaremos)
Ma suma jach'a uru taki (Para un gran día)
sung:
Kullakitanaka jilatanaka (Hermanita, hermanos)
Tak pachan sartasiñani (Todos nos levantaremos)
Kullakitanaka jilatanaka (Hermanita, hermanos)
Tak pachan sartasiñani (Todos nos levantaremos)
Kjara nacasan arma simpti (No te olvides)
Je was aymar marjka santa (Nosotros en nuestro pueblo)
Kjara nacasan arma simpti (No te olvides)
Je was aymar marjka santa (Nosotros en nuestro pueblo)
Ma pita sartasiñani (Rápido nos levantaremos)
Ma suma jach'a uru taki (Para un gran día)

Track 6: Street festivals in Bolivia feature endless parades of dancers and bands in elaborate costumes that both honor and satirize historical and mythical personalities, including the devil, Spanish conquistadores, and African slaves. G. Rojas Enríquez' Oruro, named for the Bolivian city, and G. Lizidio-Alejandro's La mariposa (The Butterfly) are well-known morenadas for which the dancers don intricate masks with exaggerated negroid features as a show of solidarity with oppressed peoples. (accordion, bombo, guitar, matraka, quena, zampoñas) 3:54

Oruro tierra de amor y de carnaval
Donde mas fuerte mi alma ha parendido amar
Hoy perdido entre tus calles vuelvo a recordar
Que enamorados un día nos vieron pasar.
Al son de las matrakas
Todos canten y bailen
La morenada
Con las palmas (clap clap clap)
Con los tacos (stomp stomp stomp)
¡Viva la fiesta!

Track 7: This Peruvian huayno features the charango and was composed by the renowned charanguista, Julio Benavente Díaz. The title, La mala yerba (The Weed), reflects how unneeded and unwanted an Indian man felt while traveling to the city. (charango, harp, ronroco) 3:00

Track 8: The lyrics of Tres de mayo (Third of May), also a Peruvian huayno, recall a short-lived romance on the third of May, a festival day in Perú. (bombo, charango, harp, quena, zampoñas) 3:11

En una noche de tres de mayo
Tuve la suerte de conocerte
Tuve la suerte de haberte querido.
Cuando decías olvidaremos
Olvidaremos todo lo pasado
Huaycheña todo lo pasado
Huaycheña todo lo pasado.

Track 9: In 1976, Gerardo Tamez of the well-known music group from México, Los Folkloristas, composed Tierra mestiza (Land of Mixed Blood) in the style of the nueva canción or new song movement. With melody, harmony, rhythm, and instrumentation, this piece captures the spirit of the mestizo people of México who have both Spanish and Indian ancestors. The harmonic progressions and expressive guitar solo recall Andalucía while the quena and zampoñas represent indigenous influences. (guitar, harp, quena, vihuela, zampoñas) 3:38

Track 10: This group of songs played on transverse flute, harp, and zarb represents centuries of Sephardic music in Spain. Si la mar era de leche (If the Sea Were Made of Milk) speaks of a man willing to die for his love. Una tarde de verano (A Summer Afternoon) tells the story of a Spanish gentleman who travels in search of a wife and finds instead his sister who had been abducted by the Moors. Even in May, one man's soul is dark from the pain of love in the song La rosa enflorece (The Rose Blooms). (harp, transverse flute, zarb) 6:21

Track 11: El amor es un camino (Love is a Path), a Venezuelan joropo, features the harp and exemplifies this lively typical dance. The lyrics use agrarian metaphors to describe the journey of love. (cuatro, harp, maracas) 4:46

El amor es un camino que se recorre hasta el fin
El amor es un camino, es un camino que se recorre hasta el fin
Yo conozco caminantes que no le dieron partir
Yo conozco caminantes que no le dieron partir
Tú dices que bien me quieres pero yo que toque poco
Tú dices que bien me quieres, que bien me quieres pero yo que toque poco
Siento que me nace agua pero me niegas el poso
Siento que me nace agua pero me niegas el poso

Abre tu vida la mía como la tierra el arado
Abre tu vida la mía como la tierra el arado
Que si te duelen los zurcos las semillas han brotado.
Que si te duelen los zurcos las semillas han brotado.

Track 12: El sariri (reprise) 1:58

When will Chaski record again?

As soon as we sell more of our existing CDs (visit us on our CD Baby page), we'll be able to record some new tunes. Any requests?




Flutes, harps & the whole world to play in!

Chaski is what you get when you take a virtuosic flute/harp duo, add a colorful collection of flutes and harps from around the world, and explore music to include them all. For almost 30 years Chaski has toured with repertoire ranging from the Mozart Flute/Harp Concerto, to Bolivian huayños, Scottish strathspeys, tunes from Playford's "The English Dancing Master" (published 1651), and world premieres of new works. Chaski frequently works in collaboration with solo artists, choirs, and, most recently, with a modern dance company, accompanying the dancers and performing alongside them..

Chaski on Facebook Chaski's YouTube channel Shana on Twitter